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The Area's Premier School of Swimming

Every day, about ten people die from unintentional drowning. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. Drowning ranks fifth among the leading causes of unintentional injury death in the United States.:

  • 4,000 Every Year: An average of about 4,000 people die from drowning every year. That is more than 10 people every day.
  • 20% Are 14 and Under: One in five people who die from drowning are children 14 and younger.
  • 5X More Are Non-Fatal: For every child who dies from drowning, another five receive emergency care for nonfatal submersion injuries


So let’s take a look at who is most at risk.

  • Males: Nearly 80% of people who die from drowning are male.
  • Children: Children ages 1 to 4 have the highest drowning rates. About 30% of children ages 1 to 4 who die from a fatal accident, do so by drowning. In fact, in this age group, drowning is the 2nd leading cause of death, behind car accidents.
  • Minorities: The fatal drowning rate of African American children ages 5 to 14 is almost three times that of white children in the same age range. In swimming pools, African American children ages 5-19 drown at rates 5.5 times higher than those of whites.  In fact, African American children ages 11-12 drown in swimming pools at rates 10 times those of white children!


According to the CDC, factors such as access to swimming pools, the desire or lack of desire to learn how to swim, and choosing water-related recreational activities may contribute to the racial differences in drowning rates. Note that available rates are based on population, not on participation. If rates could be determined by actual participation in water-related activities, the disparity in minorities’ drowning rates compared to whites would be much greater!!!!!!!

With these facts in mind, it seems ever more important to find a good program for you and your children to take swimming lessons such as those provided by Hudson Valley Swim.

Get the Facts on Drowning from the CDC